More often, Roger is the curmudgeon at The Agitator editors’ meetings, but I guess today the distinction falls to me.

Roger called my attention to this notice that on the inaugural ‘#Giving Tuesday‘ (how did I miss this on my calendar?), online contributions (at least those processed by Blackbaud) were up 53% over the same day last year.

I’m told by a reliable authority that would translate to 16,597% up from the first Tuesday an online contribution was ever made back in 2001.

Sorry. ‘#Giving Tuesday’?

Why not celebrate ‘Let’s Get Out of Bed Wednesday’? [There is an official 'Sleep-In Day' ... it's October 29, according to Wikipedia.] Or maybe ‘Take a Deep Breath Thursday’? Or for broader appeal … ‘Upgrade Your Monthly Pledge Friday’?

Don’t get me wrong, I like seeing year-over-year fundraising figures. But now, year-over-year ‘#Giving Tuesday’? Did Hallmark Greeting Cards come up with this? Humbug.

Besides, everyone knows that for this commemoration to have any analytical or historical significance whatsoever, it would need to be based on ‘Giving Monday‘.

Tom

P.S. Jeff Brooks offers a calmer critique here. But Jeff, I just can’t take the whole thing that seriously.

P.P.S. I’m on a roll now. I think we need to re-assess ALL of our commemoration days and establish some clear priorities. Clean out the commemoration clutter. Strip it down to only 365 significant events to commemorate … one per day.

For example, here are several credible alternatives for 27 November, the inaugural ‘#Giving Day’:

1910: New York’s Pennsylvania Station opened.

1973: The Senate voted 92-3 to confirm Gerald R. Ford as vice president, succeeding Spiro T. Agnew, who had resigned.

2009: Golfer Tiger Woods crashed his SUV outside his Florida mansion, sparking widespread attention to reports of marital infidelity.

Tough choices!

 

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